If you want to be healthy, vegetables aren’t optional. Don’t worry, no one is going to make you sit around the table until you finish your veggies. The First 21 Veggie Challenge is a great opportunity to try something new and hone-in on the vegetables you enjoy eating.

Why Eat Vegetables?

The stark, green, wholesome truth is your body can’t be healthy without eating vegetables. Vegetables are one of the best antioxidants and an excellent source of antioxidants, nutrients and vitamins. The nutrients and benefits of consuming vegetables are as diverse as their looks.

How Many Vegetables Should You Eat?

There is no scientific study recommending an exact amount of vegetables to eat daily. The CDC recommends eating 2.5 vegetables per day, but only 10% of Americans achieve this daily intake. As a general rule, you can eat unlimited vegetables, because you will likely be stuffed long before you reach over consumption. Remember only 1 in 10 Americans even eats the CDC’s recommended 2.5 vegetables a day.

It is exceptionally rare to overeat vegetables, but it is possible. Our experience is that most adults consuming close to 10 servings or more may have some common symptoms caused by overeating vegetables. Eating vegetables high in fiber can cause digestive distress, gas, bloating and constipation. It can also lead to poor absorption of other nutrients. A good rule of thumb is to reduce fiber rich vegetables if you start to notice any of these symptoms. Again, this is rare and less likely to happen if you are eating a wide variety of vegetables.

Participates in the First 21 Veggie Challenges have had the best success consuming between 4 and 6 servings of vegetables daily.

WHAT EQUALS ONE SERVING OF VEGETABLES?

Vegetables come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, which makes it difficult to deceiver what constitutes a serving size. For the purpose of the Veggie Challenge, vegetables are broken down into two groups; green leafy vegetables and non-leafy vegetables. Green leafy vegetables require roughly 2 cups in order to constitute one serving size. As for non-leafy vegetables, 1 cup will do the job. See the vegetable serving size info-graphic as a reference.

Eating Vegetables Reduces the Risk of the Following Diseases

  • Heart Disease

  • Type 2 Diabetes

  • Obesity

  • High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

  • Some Cancers (see the list below)

Eating Vegetables Reduces the Risk of the Following Diseases

  • Heart Disease

  • Type 2 Diabetes

  • Obesity

  • High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

  • Some Cancers (see the list below)

Prevent Cancer with a Diet Loaded with Vegetables

Vegetables are loaded with nutrients and antioxidants that boost your immune system and help to protect against certain types of cancers. Additionally, consuming higher quantities of vegetables helps to limit the amount of carcinogenic processed foods in the traditional diet.

According to the CDC only 10 percent of Americans eat enough vegetables. The First 21 Veggie Challenge is one of our most important challenges because of the immense benefits vegetables bring to your health.

Here is a List of Vegetables that May Reduce the Risk of Cancer

  • Carrots, Brussels Sprouts & Squash are high in carotenoids and may reduce the risk of lung, larynx, mouth and pharynx cancers

  • Non-Starchy Vegetables including Broccoli & Spinach may reduce the risk of stomach and esophageal cancers.

  • Peas, Bell Peppers, Dark Greens and other vegetables high in vitamin C may reduce the risk of esophageal cancer

  • Asparagus, Red Cabbage & Tomatoes contain lycopene and may reduce the risk of prostate cancer.